ADHD alphabet

Just because it’s fun. This thing was in my Facebook memories on Friday. Here we go, first word that comes to mind for each letter – and the first thoughts said word inspires. Here we go:

  • A – ape – Distant relative, who might well get to test a vaccine before people
  • B – basic – When all else is ripped from life, back to basics it is.
  • C – champagne – My favorite drink.
  • D – dude – Dude, dudette, whatever.
  • E – evening – Sun goes down and it’s time to chill.
  • F – funny – …as a heart attack. Life is.
  • G – garage – We have one, full of stuff. In our previous home it was H’s mancave.
  • H – hair – I really need a haircut. I really need to at least snip my bangs.
  • I – irony – The irony is that there’s nothing ironic in Alanis’ “Ironic”.
  • J – joke – As long as we have a sense of humor, we’ll be fine.
  • K – keeper – I just finished Kate Morton’s The Secret Keeper a few days ago.
  • L – laugh – It’s good to laugh, it helps your mind stay healthy.
  • M – manhole – Learned this word some seven years ago and it became a favorite.
  • N – novel – Well, I do love reading.
  • O – ornament – I like peculiar ornaments.
  • P – paramount – Pictures? Also one of those words I really like.
  • Q – quarantine – Really, was there any other option here?
  • R – rice – H keeps telling me that soon we’ll all be just eating rice.
  • S – sushi – Not eating this favorite food of mine while avoiding fast carbs.
  • T – tornado – None of them generally here in Finland.
  • U – usher – Another favorite word, but I myself don’t like to be ushered.
  • V – variety – It’s good. Because we’re different and like different things.
  • W – water – Clean water is the most important thing for life.
  • X – X-ray – no xylophones, ok!
  • Y – youth – …is stupid. Like those students in Florida despite Corona.
  • Z – zebra – In Finnish it’s spelled with an S and double E, seepra.

Bonus track – the scandic letters (and obviously Finnish words):

  • Å – åsikt – Opinion (in Swedish). We all have one.
    Really, this is a totally Swedish letter, even called “the Swedish O” in Finnish. I don’t think there are any Finnish words containing, let alone starting, with Å.
  • Ä – äiti – Mother. Me.
  • Ö – ötökkä – Bug. Soon it’s summer and all sorts of bugs are out again.

No, I’m really not bored

People are complaining about being bored at home now that the world is kinda closed and everybody should just stay home. That, being bored, is an opportunity I have yet to have. Even though our dance school is closed now and I have two more evenings at home during the week (yes, really, that was the extent of my away-from-home hobbies), I feel like I have even less time for everything.

I have always a gazillion small or big projects and ideas just waiting for me to have time for them. I work long hours – really, remote working hasn’t slowed that down in the least; more like I’m working even more than average right now. It’s the busiest time of spring for me at work, remote on not, Corona or not. I have dozens of books just waiting to be read and always a couple in the reading. We have remodelling projects going on always, and there’s the daily and weekly tasks like cooking for people and dogs, laundry and other such stuffs.

No, I do not have idle time. On the contrary, I still pick and choose and prioritize what I do in my free time. I try to have time to read every evening, but it doesn’t always happen. I try to spend some time with daughter every evening; she pretty much makes sure that at least happens always ;) I go out with the dogs, and now that the weather is getting nicer and daughter is getting bored at home, we try to go out for longer walks with the dogs together.

Sometimes I dream of having so much time on my hands that I actually get done with everything and find myself bored shitless. I know you should be careful what you wish for, ’cause you just might get it. No, I don’t want to be unemployed or anything and it’s not likely either being that our company is exactly in this modern remote working business as a cloud consultation company. Just, a few month sabbatical or something would be nice.

Is suppose there’s three things here:

1) I’m quite good at entertaining myself with writing, reading, and photography, all of which go before any Netflix series or movies currently. There’s times I watch a lot of Netflix, then there’s times when I only watch movies when daughter asks me to watch one with her.

2) My husband is quite good at keeping me busy – no, don’t go there, nothing X-rated about this! As I said there’s the remodeling and renovation stuff going on in this house of ours and when my husband does things, he doesn’t do things half-assed, so things take time. He also has a bit higher domestic standards than the bohemic little me, so there’s always stuff to do around the house (even as under-cleaned the place remains).

3) I don’t live alone. There’s always stuff to do when you have dogs and kids (though there’s only one left here now). Oh, and a spouse. Not to forget the spouse :)

If I now had too much time and too little to do right now, while stuck at home, I’d do some online dance classes (not to say I might not get to that anyway!), since due to this Corona stuff our dance school is offering video dance classes on their website. I’d also watch some Broadway shows, at least for the seven day free trial (if I had too much time I probably would get the subscription too). I’d also go more for longer walks outside, as long as the weather permits. I’d take my camera with me – and be fiddling with the photos a long time again afterwards.

In case you’re very bored, you can also read my daily jaddajaddas about my #coronageddon on my diary page :D

Throwback to the blog-slow year 2019

[Suomeksi]

This year, 2019, has probably been the slowest one ever, when it comes to posting blogs. It’s not like I’ve stopped thinking and having opinions, it’s just that I haven’t seemed to have the energy to form full blog posts, write actual articles. Maybe I’ve also been a tad more turned toward myself than usual. I’ve been reading books rather than writing anything myself. According to the Goodreads stats, I’ve read approximately 1,5 times as much this year than either of the previous ones (when using Goodreads) – and the year ain’t even over yet.

readingstat2019.jpg
[My Year in Books]

However, there’s more to this year than books, too.

January
Pic of the month: 

2019-01-20 12.18.30
We sure had snow!

New phone (iPhone8), son bought his first car, took a heartbear tattoo on my left arm (my tribute to the animals of my life)
Book of the month: Playing with Fire, Tess Gerritsen – an excellent psychological thriller
Quote of the month: “The fact that Ewan McGregor’s brother Colin McGregor is a pilot in the Royal Air Force and his aviator nickname is ‘Obi-Two’ is my new favorite bit of knowledge” – im not right in the head.com

February
Pic of the month: 

2019-02-02 11.42.38
Horse football at Ypäjä open doors day

Just life, I suppose. Ypäjä (where my son studied) open doors day
R.I.P. Matti Nykänen (the Finnish ski jumping hero)
Book of the month: The Tinker’s Girl, Catherine Cookson – an interesting story from the poorer side of the 1800’s England (than Austens)
Quote of the month: ”Feelings come and go, unless you don’t feel them. Then they stay, and hurt, and grow pear-shaped and weird.” – David Duchovny (Holy Cow)

March
Pic of the month: 

2019-03-10 13.34.32-2
It ain’t spring till the great tit sings…

Overnight in Uusikaupunki (business trip) and while I was gone, daughter and husband changed our broken dishwasher to a new one
Book of the month: Karhunpesä, Venla Hiidensalo – a beautiful story of being a finn over the past hundred years or so
Quote of the month:
“The inner battle of an AD(H)D/OCD:
– okay, good enough
– but it’s not neat!
– okay then (hasty tidying)
– still messed up
– but I don’t have the patience to do better!
– aaarh, that hurts my head, my eyes, I can’t live with that!
– you have to!
– I can’t!
– ok, fine (some more touches here and there)
– well, better, but…
– no! no more buts! walk away and forget!
– but…!
– no!” – me

April
Pic of the month: 

2019-04-06 17.45.31
My beloved orchids <3

Youngest one turned 16, my orchid family got three additions, growing chilis, parliamentary elections (I voted), MRI of my head (no regrowth)
R.I.P.
Lasse Pöysti (a Finnish actor who also used to read children’s stories on TV)
Book of the month
: Perunkirjoitus, Roope Lipasti – a humoristically written story that actually delves surprisingly deep into human nature
Quote of the month: “I’m a mother. I catch things.” – me

May
Kuukauden kuva: 

2019-05-14 20.25.18
One persistant little violet growing through gravel

Eldest graduated from Ypäjä, youngest finished junior high and thus ended her mandatory school, long weekend in southern France with the middle one, European parliamentary elections (I voted)
Book of the month: The Ministry of Utmost Happiness, Roy Arundhati – slight bit slow and detailed, but very intriguing book about India and sexual diversity (in India)
Quote of the month: “What about the worm? He got up early and died.” – Rat (Pearls Before Swine, Stephan Pastis)

June
Pic of the month: 

2019-06-04 18.45.19
Kayaking with my colleagues

Muse in concert at Suvilahti, kayaking with colleagues, company summer party, building our deck
Book of the month: The Miniaturist, Jessie Burton – a beautiful story about secrets and diversity in middle-age Amsterdam
Quote of the month: “I always feel kinda warm inside when someone says fuck more than me” – me

July
Pic of the month: 

2019-07-08 15.36.31
I read just a few Harry Potters during my vacation (all of them, of course)

Got our deck ready, got a hot tub on the deck, built some boxes and a small storage cabinet on the deck, and I had my four weeks of summer vacation!
Book of the month: Antautuminen, Anja Snellman – a biographic book about life as a hyper-sensitive person (HSP)
Quote of the month: “Toisinaan taikuus on turhaa” [Sometimes magic is unnecessary] – Wizard (The Wizard of Id, Parker & Hart)

August
Pic of the month: 

2019-08-02 21.13.33-1
Crawfish party in our own yard

Terrace warmer! Company kick-off in Suomenlinna, slow-juicer (that has been used weekly ever since), little extension of my library, 25th anniversary meetup of my theology class
Book of the month: Uskollinen lukija, Max Seeck – a thriller of the best sort (published in English as The Faithful Reader)
Quote of the month: “You’ll never find another me. Not sure if that’s a good thing or bad thing, but it’s the truth.” – i’m not right in the head.com

September
Pic of the month: 

2019-09-22 13.44.40-1
There were still some summery days left

Middle one turned 18 and got a proper party, eldest turned 19 (and partied with friends)
Book of the month: The Night Circus, Erin Morgenstern – a beautiful dreamy fantasy
Quote of the month: “Teen beating around the bush about my schedule after work.
Me: What are you getting at?
Teen: I was wondering if you could make me some dinner.
Me: But… you only just ate yesterday!” – me and my youngest

October
Pic of the month: 

2019-10-07 17.27.57-1
Autumn came, again

Conch-piercing in my left ear, daytrip to Tampere (on business, but got myself some lovely new Laura Vitas from the trip too), “Mies joka rakasti järjestystä” (The man who loved order) in the theater
Book of the month: The Clockmaker’s Daughter, Kate Morton – a mystery woven so talentedly, that the mystery itself is almost like an afterthought
Quote of the month: “Do we have enough wine for you to take all the seeds out of these?” – Husband, when looking at the about million rocoto chilis waiting to be de-seeded

November
Pic of the month: 

DSCN2839
We had first snow in November (but nope, it did not stay)

Eldest moved to his own home, I bought myself an Apple Watch, postal workers were on strike for some weeks
Book of the month: Winternight Trilogy, Katherine Arden – a romantic fantasy adventure in the Russian winter
Quote of he month: “Whenever you cry, I wish I was a spider. Then I would spin you a tissue.” – Walter, 6 years old (@fearlessfranny)

December
Kuukauden kuva: 

2019-12-20 18.59.11
In the opera. Husband’s iPhone 11 takes excellent photos in the dark

Crsis that broke our government, company Christmas party weekend in Lehmonkärki, La Bohème in the opera, Christmas break
Book of the month: Surrounded by Idiots, Thomas Erikson – a book everyone should read. Helps understand yourself and others, and maybe communicate a bit better
Quote of the month: “You know what it takes to make a star shine? A shit load of fuking darkness.” – unknown

Fragments

Two drunks are sitting on the low wall next to Lidl. Skinny legs crossed, beer can in hand, puffy face turned to look at the store-goers and sneer at those better-offs getting our of high-end cars like BMWs and Mercs. People like us. When we come out, they have vanished.

Driving out of the parking lot and turning on to the main road, we see a fragment of a hat, a glimplse of a face, a ray of light reflecting from a beer can. The dudes have migrated to a nook in the little patch of forest on the other side of the road. “That’s one kind of a life, I guess,” I think to myself as I wonder if they have a family somewhere, wishing they were home instead.

A young woman sporting a backpack running down the street in jump shoes. Is she out for a workout or in a hurry to get somewhere? “Would be fun to try out jump shoes sometime,” I note, as another thought enters my mind: my family would not let me put them on, in fear that next they need to call an ambulance.

Middle-aged man in an electric wheelchair in the hardware store with his wife. Wife is browsing the shelves while the man sits helpless in the wheelchair, waiting. Wife finds whatever tool she was looking for and they go through the cash register. “How would that feel? To be bound to a wheelchair, not being able to contribute,” I wonder and recon that it would still be different for me and for my husband. I might take it as a relief from all this *doing*. He might go down in despair.

Three teens sitting in swings in the park, just loitering, being teens. For a fleeting moment I think: “Ah, that freedom of being young! With no care in this world!” Then I remember it’s just an illusion. Teen years are harsh and probably more difficult than anything that comes later. Unless you’re BPD and have a permanently underdeveloped frontal cortex.

The tram starts from the traffic light. It was all predictable, but I fall down on my ass all the same. My balance has failed me, again. It was less than a week since it did it in a bus. I find myself sprawled on the tram floor, in my clunky heels and in my dress. Less than gracefully I gather myself up as fast as I can. People look away demurely. Only two young ladies seem worried as they ask if I’m ok. I decide not to be embarrassed, smile at them and tell them I’m fine. With an aching ankle I step out as we have reached my stop, and hold my head up high as I walk towards my destination.

Stories. We all have our stories and when we see other people out and about, a small fragment of our story is revealed. Most of the time it is puzzling to anyone watching, because the short moment is out of context. Only when you get to know a person, talk to them for some time, do you get to know the outlines of their story. Only when you spend time with them for years on end, might you actually learn their story.

Take a random excerpt from a book. It may intrigue you, it may be meaningless, it may sound completely insane. Read the book flap and it may make sense. Maybe you want to read more and decide to get the book. Maybe it is disinteresting and you will never find out what lies beneath those covers. Obviously, you will never be able to read all books in this universe. Obviously it’s not necessary either.

In her book called “Outline” Rachel Cusk delves into people’s stories in a way that the main character remains practially unknown. All of the characters do, really. It’s all about fragments, pieces of life, that get told. Some stories you can relate to, some not so much. It is an interesting read, but so intense that it felt like overload. Like being trapped in a social situation, forced to listen to people cite their life to you. In the end, I wouldn’t have cared to learn more about any of them. I also decided that I didn’t care to read the rest of the trilogy.

This blog of mine, it too is just fragments. Little bits and pieces of my life, crumbs and morsels of my mind. We all choose what we share with the rest of the world, irl and online. We all construct an official story to show the world and conceal the real one lying beneath. Occasionally the curtain flutters, occasionally you might see through someone else’s curtain. You will still see only a little bit of what’s beyond.

So be kind, do not judge. For you don’t know the whole story. You don’t know what the smile covers up.

Life is a book club

“Reading isn’t the opposite of doing, it’s the opposite of dying.”

When you love reading and are surrounded by (or at least have one or two in your life) with others who love reading, your life becomes a book club quite naturally. You read, you talk about what you’re reading and what you’ve read, you share ideas, thoughts and books. Even if you don’t necessarily read the same book at the same time. Those traditional “everybody read this book and then we discuss it” book clubs have somehow always rubbed me the wrong way.

endofyourlife

Will Schwalbe and his mother had a book club somewhere between the idea of “our whole life has been a book club” and a traditional one. Just the two of them. A book club that had nothing and yet everything to do with Will’s mother’s, Mary Anne’s, pancreatic cancer, which was diagnosed at a point where she was supposed to have maybe four to six months of time left. She however lived for two more years, going through chemo and other treatments. A whole lot of the book club actually happened in the outpatient center waiting for chemos and doctor’s appointments etc. In fact, that’s where it started.

From the very beginning this true story totally engulfed me. Not that it was a page turner, not really, but there were so many aspects to the book, that simply drew me in on a very deep level. For one, and the main reason I even got interested in the book, there were the books those two were reading. My list of books to read grew significantly while reading this one. And then there was the whole setting of terminal illness, treatments, the relationship between the mother and the son, all about the people and their realizations and Mary Anne’s wisdom. It all made be pause and reflect here and there and constantly, making reading the book quite slow.

I made as many as 35 (exactly, it seems!) bookmark notes in the book while reading it. Highly irregular for me, but this one I really wanted to be able to return to through some passages I found especially good or hitting home. My first note is marked on the very first sentence of the book: “We are nuts about the mocha in the waiting room at Memorial Sloan-Kettering’ outpatient care center.” Oh, I’m nuts about the cappucinos of Espresso House, but the mocha was not the reason for the note. It’s just that the book had me with its very opening line. The best ones do.

Actually, that thought is in the book too, at the very beginning of the second chapter, “Appointment in Samarra”. Each chapter title marks something Will and Mary Anne read – a book, a flyer, an article, a new version of an old story. Will and Mary Anne were suckers for opening lines, too. And books about books and reading. And Mary Anne shared my habit of checking out the ending first. This, by the way, is a learning point for me when reading in Kindle. Of course I can go the end of the book in Kindle too, but then it messes the furthest read point. So I don’t. So I endure the suspence on a much more intense level than with paper books where I can just flip throught the pages occasionally to ease my mind.

While books and reading were definitely the salt and sugar of the book, the setting of cancer and dying threw me right back to the time when my mother was diagnosed and treated and dying and died. It was a difficult time for me – us all, obviously, but I had my own issues with mom and they pretty much exploded at that time, making my relationship with mom cordial at best, at the time of her death. Mary Anne and my mom shared a bunch of qualities and then again were like night and day.

My relationship with my mom was much like Will’s with his, until the ugliness of things surfaced. While Will realized that part of the process of his mom was dying was mourning not just her death, but also the death of his dreams of things to come, I realized that I was mourning a mother I hadn’t had. Not to get me wrong – I was close with my mom. In fact, the whole problem lies exactly there: I was too close with my mom. It was a codependence that ripped me off my integrity as a person.

Funny how little things can make you feel like you totally can relate to someone else’s life and story. I was in the middle of a meeting when my mom called me to let me know about her cancer. Will was in the middle of a book fair, working. Will found himself crying for the first time for his mom on a flight – though his mom at that point still very much alive. When my mom died, I cried properly for the first time a couple weeks later, on board an airplane, headed to Las Palmas to bury my mother.

Also, Will’s mom was quite religious about thank you notes. My dad, too. Or at least thank you phone calls. Where Will spent Christmas Day writing notes, I called my grandparents and godparents to thank them for their Christmas gifts. I hated those calls. I felt awkward and apart from my grandma, the receivers of them seemed to feel a bit awkward (or maybe it was all just me). My grandma took the opportunity to go on and on about what she’d been thinking when buying the gift, how extraordinary she had found it and “isn’t it just the best thing since sliced bread?” And I’d feel even more awkward. My dad called to remind me about these calls still when I was over thirty, until I once totally snapped about it. Will found later on, that there’s a great joy in thanking. I still rather give than thank. I think I’m traumatized ;)

It also seemed to me, I was a pretty similar kid as Will. Preferring the indoors with books to the outdoors with sports. Rather reading and talking about books and music with his friends, huddled in his room, than outside doing sports. Not that those two necessarily rule each other out, just as a preference. I was a pretty lonely kid, with books as my best friends, but I do remember spending hours with my few friends just reading together. We’d swap books – which is how I found e.g. Nancy Drew and the Dana Girls series – and read some more. Then we’d go for a swim, play some badminton outside, go skiing, and play cards. Or go out to the lake in a row boat and read there!

The list of books mentioned and talked of in this book is so long that I won’t bother to even start. A few are worth mentioning, though, the first one being The Hobbit. Tolkien has never really been my thing, but I think I figured out why: Will read it while being delirious with fever. I think I might have enjoyed it like that too ;) Will did return to The Hobbit as an adult though, and noted that it still had the same power over him. I thought I might give Hobbit a chance, maybe, some day. Possibly. I never got past page 150 of the Lord of the Rings, and if a book takes that long (or longer, I suppose) to begin and draw me in, it’s not my kind of book.

One book that, due to its nature as a daily passage book, is mentioned and referred to throughout the book. “Daily Strength for Daily Needs” is the title of this book. Mary Anne gets an old used copy of it and somehow the worn book with markings and dog ears makes it a remarkable book in itself. It is quite religious in its passages, having some Christian thoughts and some non for each day. Mary Anne immediately falls in love with the book and carries it with her always. Sometimes she leaves it lying out in the open, opened at a certain page, for Will to find and read too. She doesn’t push, for Will is not religious, but she offers. And the book itself intrigues Will too.

Even though I read a lot in Kindle, I still love those actual paper books. I love having a library, I love seeing and touching and smelling books, and I very much love my old copies of books, many of which I haven’t even read. There’s something about the physicality of a book, especially one that has been owned before. Like the previous owner(s) have left something of their life and story behind in the book. Most of my old books belonged to my grandparents or great-grandparents. We’re a pretty booky family, just like Will’s too. He also shares my notion that eBooks are good for consuming certain types of books on the go, but there’s a lot that you simply need to have physically.

One of Mary Anne’s many projects was gathering funds to build a library in Afganistan. Mary Anne traveled the world taking part in all sorts of humanitarian aid projects and fought for women’s rights where there were none and towards the end of her life, when she could channel her strength to one thing anymore, she chose to make this library her first and foremost priority and was determined to see it through before she died. She more or less did too.

When asked, why this library was so important to her, she answered not that because she loves books and thinks their important but because “sometimes even before medicine and shelter-they want books for their children.” Because she had seen the power of books, not just in her own family’s priviledged life, but specifically for those less fortunate in this world. “When ever you read something wonderful, it cahnges your life, even if you aren’t aware of it,” Mary Anne noted a bit later in the book. Indeed! Even when you read something not so wonderful.

Another one of my favorite quotes about reading comes not from Mary Anne or Will, but is form the book The Uncommon Reader, quoted in this book. In the passage, the Queen of England says: “Books are not about passing time. They’re about other lives. Other worlds. Far from wanting time to pass, Sir Kevin, one just wishes one had more of it. If one wanted to pass time, one could go to New Zeeland.”  Now ain’t that the truth!

Mary Anne lived her life going to places most people don’t dare go because of the war and the unrest. Places my husband wouldn’t let me go for fear of something happening to me. Still she never regarded herself a brave woman – though most other people did. Her notion of bravery goes in the lines of “bravery is not somehing you do because you do without fear; it’s something you do in spite of it”. One could then draw the conclusion that Mary Anne was not afraid of dying, not when she went to those places and not when she suffered her cancer, and she said so much herself too. She lived as much, too. My mom, too, said so, but in the end she feared death more than anything.

Dealing with death, you inevitably think about loneliness too. The loneliness that will result from the death of someone you love. Growing up, mom was my best friend (something she accomplished by guilt tripping and isolating me, the latter being maybe not so calculated, though). As I noted, I was a lonely kid. I had a few good friends, but one after the other they all moved away. I spent a lot of time alone with my books and little sister. Will touched the subject of loneliness while he and Mary Anne were reading the book Kokoro, by Natsume Soseki. There, a teacher says: “Loneliness is the price we have to pay for being born in this modern world, so full of freedom, independence and our own egoistical selves.” Will thought it true. Me, I’m not entirely sure.

One thing is for sure, though. If you have siblings, you are never entirely alone. Will has two siblings. I have a sister, who was a total nuisance to me when growing up (though of course I loved her even then!), and whom I almost lost from my life (mostly thanks to my mom) at the point when mom was dying, but who has always been there for me, like I’ve been there for her. At the era of personalized cell phone ring tones, my sister’s tone on my phone was the Friends theme song. As said, we had a bit of a fall out but managed to correct things later on and currently talk weekly over messenger (as she lives on the other side of the Atlantic with her family). She’s the one I have my “book club” with. We don’t always talk about books, but often we do.

We also talk a lot about our kids, oviously. Mine are already adults, or almost. Her’s are only starting their school career, one just finishing first grade, the other one still a preschooler. Naturally we talk a whole lot about raising kids – and about our parents and how we were raised. Will writes about this when reflecting on a book called “The Price of Salt”, that made him remember something from his childhood. “You piece together your parents’ child-raising theories by analyzing later why they did what they did. One of the many great things about having siblings is that you get to do this in a communal, Talmudic way.” True dat! My only regret is that with our age difference and very different lives, we have only got to this with my sister, when my kids are practically grown. Then again, its just as important to me as a person as it is for making decisions about your own ways of raising children. So better late than never, I suppose!

While being hugely different in so many ways, my sister and I are still rather similar in some ways. She is meticulous and religious about rules and wants to do the child-raising thing by the book (which book, though, is sometimes the question) wheras I paint with the big brush. “Lite ditåt”, my grandmother used to say. It means more or less on the spot, close enough. One thing we have in common is the need to devour stories, read books, to widen our horizons, to understand this world and people better. Here my husband is quite different: he reads to learn “stuff”, things. And a vast knowledge about all sorts of things he has too! One of the things I fell in love with. And this is something I realized while reading this book and how Will describes the differences between Stieg Larsson’s detective characters and their ways of acquiring information and understanding.

“While Lisbeth Salander finds what she needs on the computer, Bloomkvist looks to books and genealogies and photographs  […] for his discoveries. The two characters compliment each other, as do their approaches to knowledge.” I think this very much goes for me and my husband too.

At the end of the book Mary Anne dies, obviously. Surrounded by her family. In this book, you didn’t need to flip to the end to understand that. Will wrote his book, which he had started to plan already while his mom was still alive, Mary Anne even giving him some notes for it. She did love to be in the middle of things and influence pretty much everything. At some point while reading the book I simply had to google her too. She did seem to be quite a remarkable woman! Read and be inspired!

“We’re all in the en-of-our-life book club, whether we acknowledge it or not; each book we read may well be the last, each conversation the final one.”